What went wrong between these two spiritual titans?

David is a mighty man in battle.

It is with a sober reflection that I am writing this after considering what happened between David and his fellow giant in the spirit, Ahithophel.

David is described as a man after God’s heart, a man that God made the Davidic covenant with. He is a spiritual giant and a man that is knowledgeable about the things of God.

David is a mighty warrior, but in his kingdom is Ahithophel, a man that he described as a man my equal, my guide, and my acquaintance. Ahithophel is a man greatly renowned for his sagacity. He is a specialist in turning enemies into an ally.

He is a man full of wisdom, and he is just the brain behind David. Ahithophel’s counsel is described as the Word of God, Ahithophel was granted access by Almighty God into the Divine powers of the Holy Name (YHWH).

Ahithophel had been David’s chief counselor for many years, so he was the most trusted man in his cabinet.

In second Samuel chapter 15 verse 12 Absalom did not hesitate to call Ahithophel and seek his counsel when he was planning to overthrow his father.

This indicates to me that there was some bad blood between the king and his counselor which had been ongoing for quite a period of time. I don’t know if David was aware of it, but Absalom was. 

In second Samuel chapter 16 verses, 21 through 23 Ahithophel advises Absalom to have intercourse with this father’s concubines on the roof of the house in public view. This is the ultimate degradation and the ultimate insult that Absalom could do to his father. 

In chapter 17 verses 1 and 2 Ahithophel asks Absalom if he himself can pursue David, capture him when he is weak, and destroy him. Ahithophel wants to bring David’s head personally to Absalom. 

Now the question here is what could cause this trusted aid to David for so many years to hate him so badly that he would tell his son how to humiliate him and that he would want to kill David? 

The answer to this question I believe is hidden in the Scriptures. If you search carefully, it will come to light. 

The first part of the answer is found in second Samuel chapter 11 and verse three. When David saw Bathsheba bathing on her roof and wanted to have an affair with her, he sent someone to get her. Let’s look at the answer that was given to the king:  “And David sent and inquired after the woman. And one said, Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?”

Now the Bible does not say who was talking to David, but I certainly believe that it could’ve been Ahithophel. Why? Because he was David’s chief counselor, and if that would anyone who would attempt to correct David, it would have been him.

Notice that the person is attempting to warn David that she is the daughter of Eliam and the wife of Uriah. This person is attempting tactfully to stop the king from doing what he has intended to do. 

In second Samuel chapter 23 and verse 34 when we look into Ahithophel’s genealogy we can find we find our answer 

Eliphelet the son of Ahasbai, the son of the Maachathite, Eliam the son of Ahithophel the Gilonite.

Did you see the answer? Bathsheba was the daughter of Eliam, who was Ahithophel’s son. So when David murdered Uriah, he was actually murdering Ahithophel’s son-in-law.

When he had the affair with Bathsheba, he was actually having the affair with Ahithophel’s granddaughter.

We must be careful because our sin will surely find us out and cause severe consequences. One consequence of David’s sin was that his most trusted advisor carried the grudge for many years, which was the reason that he helped his son to overthrow him.

I can only imagine the pain that Ahithophel carried for all of those years, knowing that the man that he served had devastated his family so.

Ahithophel who had been David’s counselor and right-hand man for many many years quickly betrayed him and even counseled Absalom against David when he overthrew the kingdom

Ahithophel had been David’s chief counselor for many years, so he was the most trusted man in his cabinet.

In second Samuel chapter 15 verse 12, Absalom did not hesitate to call Ahithophel and seek his counsel when he was planning to overthrow his father. This shows to me that there was some bad blood between the king and his counselor, which had been ongoing for quite a period. I don’t know if David was aware of it but Absalom was. 

In second Samuel chapter 16 verses, 21 through 23 Ahithophel advises Absalom to have intercourse with this father’s concubines on the roof of the house in public view. This is the ultimate degradation and the ultimate insult that Absalom could do to his father. 

In chapter 17 verses 1 and 2 Ahithophel asks Absalom if he himself can pursue David, capture him when he is weak, and destroy him. Ahithophel wants to bring David’s head personally to Absalom. 

Now the question here is what could cause this trusted aid to David for so many years to hate him so badly that he would tell his son how to humiliate him and that he would want to kill David? 

The answer to this question I believe is hidden in the Scriptures. If you search carefully, it will come to light. 

The first part of the answer is found in the second Samuel chapter 11 and verse three. When David saw Bathsheba bathing on her roof and wanted to have an affair with her, he sent someone to get her. Let’s look at the answer that was given to the king: “And David sent and inquired after the woman. And one said, Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?”

Now the Bible does not say who was talking to David, but I certainly believe that it could’ve been Ahithophel. Why? Because he was David’s chief counselor and if that would anyone who would attempt to correct David, it would have been him.

Notice that the person is attempting to warn David that she is the daughter of Eliam and the wife of Uriah. This person is attempting tactfully to stop the king from doing what he has intended to do. 

In second Samuel chapter 23 and verse 34 when we look into Ahithophel’s genealogy we can find we find our answer 

Eliphelet the son of Ahasbai, the son of the Maachathite, Eliam the son of Ahithophel the Gilonite.

Did you see the answer? Bathsheba was the daughter of Eliam, who was Ahithophel’s son. So when David murdered Uriah, he was actually murdering Ahithophel’s son-in-law.

When he had the affair with Bathsheba, he was actually having the affair with Ahithophel’s granddaughter.

We must be careful because our sin will surely find us out and cause severe consequences. One consequence of David’s sin was that his most trusted advisor carried the grudge for many years, which was the reason that he helped his son to overthrow him.

I can only imagine the pain that Ahithophel carried for all of those years knowing that the man that he served had devastated his family so.

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